WORKS OF MARY AND ELIZABETH HAYS IN RELATION TO DISSENTING WOMEN'S LITERARY HISTORY


 

    Hays Sisters                                             Other Dissenting Women Writers

1784-86.  Poems and short moral tales by Mary Hays in the Universal Magazine.

Steele, Mary (1753-1813) [Baptist]. ‘To Miss Scot [sic], on reading the Female Advocate’, signed ‘Sylvia’,The Lady’s Magazine 5 (1774), 662-63.

---. ‘Thoughts on Discontent.’ MS. 1775. Published in The Young Woman’s Companion; or, Female Instructor. Ed. J. A. Stewart. Oxford: Bartlett and Newman, 1814. 753–57.

Scott, Mary (1751-1793) [Independent/Unitarian]. ‘To Miss Aikin, on Reading her Poems.’  Gentleman’s Magazine 44 (1774), 327.  

---. ‘To Jonas Hanway.’ Gentleman’s Magazine 61 (1787), 104.

de Fleury, Maria (1752/53-1792) [Baptist/Independent]. Poems in The Protestant Magazine, 1780-82. 

---. Poems Occasioned by the Confinement and Acquittal of the Right Honourable Lord George Gordon, President of the Protestant Association. London: Printed for the author by R. Denham, No. 100, Salisbury Court, Fleet Street.  And sold by Mr. Margram, Southampton-street, Strand; Mrs. Dee, No. 35, Charles-street, Horse-lye-down; Mr. Tillcock, No. 10, Warwick Lane; and by the author, No. 2, City Mews, White Cross-street, 1781.

---. Unrighteous Abuse Detected and Chastised, or, A Vindication of Innocence and Integrity, being an Answer to a Virulent Poem, intituled, The Protestant Association.  2nd ed.  London: Printed (for the author) by R. Denham, no. 20, Primrose Hill, Salisbury Square.  Sold by the Author, No. 2, City Mews, White Cross Street; and by the Printer, as above.  1781.  [A response to a poem by Charles Wesley.]

---. Henry, or the Triumph of Grace.  A Sacred Poem.  Dedicated, by Permission, to the right Honorable Lord George Gordon. London: Printed by R. Denham, No. 20, Salisbury-Square.  Sold by the Author, No. 2, City-Mews, White-Cross-street; and by the Printer, [as above], 1782.

---. An Ode occasioned by the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Dowland, daughter of Mr. John Fullford, shipwright; who died soon after the birth and death of her second child, the 12th of April, 1783, in the twenty-fourth year of her age. London: Printed and Sold, at the Chapel, in Rose-Lane, near Ratcliff-Cross; and at Mr. Miller’s, No 73, Rosemary-Lane,  [1783].  

---. Henry: or the Wanderer Reclaimed:  a sacred poem. Humbly addressed to British youth. London: Printed by W. Justins, for the author; and sold at No. 31, Jewin-street, and at the printer's, 1786.

---. Hymns for Believer’s Baptism. London: Printed by W. Justins, Albion’s Buildings, Bartholomew Close; and sold at the Rev. Mr. Kirkham’s Meeting-house, Red-Cross-street, near Cripplegate, London, 1786. 

---. British Liberty Established, and Gallic Liberty Restored; or, The Triumph of Freedom.  A Poem.  Occasioned by the Grand Revolution in France, M,DCC, LXXXIX.  [Inscription: “To a prospect of the glorious time when true religion and civil liberty shall shed their benign influences over the world.”]  London: (from Peterborough-house Press):  Printed for the author, No. 31, Jewin Street; and sold by J. Matthews, Strand; H. D. Symonds, Pater-Noster-Row; J. Nott, Lombard Street; Ash, Tower Street; Thompson, Oxford Road; and by Mrs. Hancock, Beach Street, Barbican, 1790.    

 

Hays, Mary. Cursory Remarks on an Enquiry into the Expediency and Propriety of Public or Social Worship: inscribed to Gilbert Wakefield, B.A., late fellow of Jesus-College, Cambridge. London: T. Knott, No. 47 Lombard Street,1792.

 

Dutton, Anne (1692-1765) [Baptist]. A Letter to the Reverend Mr. John Wesley: in Vindication of the Doctrines of Absolute, Unconditional Election. London: J. Hart, and sold by J. Lewis [and Mary Lewis], and E. Gardner, 1743.

---. Letters to the Reverend Mr. John Westley [sic] against Perfection as not Attainable in this Life. London: J. Hart, 1743.

---. Letters on Spiritual Subjects, &c. Divers Occasions, Sent to the Reverend George Whitefield, and others of his Friends and Acquaintance... London: printed by J. Hart and sold by John Lewis and Ebenezer Gardner, 1745.

de Fleury, Maria. A Letter to the Rev. Mr. Huntington. London: Printed and sold by T. Wilkins, Aldermanbury; sold also at No. 31, Jewin-Street, 1787.  

---. An Answer to the Daughter’s Defence of her Father, addressed to her Father Himself.  London: Printed and Sold by T. Wilkins, no. 23, Aldermanbury; sold also at No. 31, Jewin-street; and by R. Thomson, Corner of Crown-Court, Little Poultney-Street, Soho, 1788.  

---. A Serious Address to the Rev. Mr. Huntington; containing some Remarks on his Sermon, entitled “The servant of the Lord, described and vindicated.” London: Printed and Sold by T. Wilkins, No. 23, Aldermanbury; sold also by J. Fuller, Broad-Way, Deptford; J. Matthews, Strand; R. Thomason, Corner of Crown-Court, Little Poultney-Street, Soho; H. Trapp, Paternoster-Row, J. Pitcher, Barbican; and at No. 31, Jewin-Street, 1788.  

---.  Antinomianism Unmasked and Refuted; and the Moral Law proved from the Scriptures of the Old and New-Testament. To be still in full Force as the rule of the Christian’s Conduct.  London:  T. Wilkins, Aldermansbury. Sold also by H. Symon[d]s, No. 20, Paternoster-row; and by the author, No. 31, Jewin-Street, London; also by Mrs. Waugh, Fisher-row, Reading; and Mrs. Horton, Wallingford, Berks., 1791. 

---. Falsehood examined at the Bar of Truth; or, A farewell to Mr. Wm Huntington, and Mr. Thomas Jones, of Reading:  containing Strictures on the Broken cistern; written by the former, addressed to the Rev. Mr. Ryland, Senior. And upon Mystery Babylon, encompassed for utter destruction, written by the latter.  London:  T. Wilkins, Aldermansbury.  Sold also by Mrs. Trapp, No. 1, Paternoster Row; M. Gurney, No. 228 [incorrect—128] Holborn; and by the author, No. 31, Jewin-Street, 1791.  

Barbauld, Anna Letitia [Presbyterian/Unitarian]. Remarks on Mr. G. Wakefield's enquiry into the expediency and propriety of public or social worship. London: J. Johnson, 1792.

 

Hays, Mary. Letters and Essays, Moral, and Miscellaneous. London: T. Knott, 1793.

 

Rowe, Elizabeth Singer (1674-1737) [Independent]. Letters Moral and Entertaining, in Prose and Verse.  2nded. London: T. Worrall, 1734. 

Steele, Anne (1717-78) [Baptist]. Miscellaneous Pieces in Verse and Prose. Bristol: W. Pine, 1780.

de Fleury, Maria. Divine poems and essays on various subjects . . .  London: Printed for the author, and sold by T[homas]. Wilkins  . . . , Mr. Nott [Knott], Lombard street; M. Gurney, no. 128, Holborn, and by the author, no. 31, Jewin-street, 1791.

1796-1801.  Various articles by Mary Hays in the Monthly Magazine and a few in the Analytical Review.  

 

Coltman, Elizabeth (1761-1838) [Presbyterian/Baptist].  “Journal, written during a Hasty Ramble to the Lakes.” Monthly Magazine 10 (1800), 11–16, 119–23. [This is not Elizabeth Coltman Heyrick (1769-1831), the abolitionist from Leicester. The two women were friends and attended the Great Meeting together for many years.]

Steele, Mary. “Lines occasioned by reading in the Magazines for August and September, 1800, the Journal of a Hasty Ramble to the Lakes.” Monthly Magazine 11 (1801), 423.

Andrews [Saffery], Maria Grace (1772-1858) [Anglican/Baptist]. Poems in the Evangelical Magazine , composed between 1794 and 1800. 

 

Hays, Mary. Memoirs of Emma Courtney. London: G. G. & J. Robinson, Paternoster Row, 1796.

Hays [Lanfear], Elizabeth (c.1765-1825) [Baptist/Unitarian]. Fatal Errors (written c. 1796-97). London: A. J. Valpy, [1819].

Hays, Mary. The Victim of Prejudice. London:  J. Johnson, 1799.

   Andrews [Saffery], Maria Grace.  The Noble Enthusiast; A Modern Romance. 3 vols. London:      

   Minerva Press, 1792. 

 

 

 

Hays, Mary. Appeal to the Men of Great Britain. London: J. Johnson; and J. Bell, 1798.

   Scott, Mary. The Female Advocate. London: J. Johnson, 1774. 

   Steele, Mary. ‘Occasioned by Reading a Poem entitled, “The Female Right to Literature ...”’, 1773.

Hays, Mary. “Wollstonecraft.” Annual Necrology, 1797-98. London: R. Phillips, 1800.

   Coltman, Elizabeth.  “Memoir, Mrs. John Coltman.” Monthly Magazine 14 (1802): 363–64.

 

Hays, Mary. Female Biography. 6 vols. London: R. Phillips, 1803.

 

Scott, Mary. The Female Advocate. London: J. Johnson, 1774.

Anthony, Susanna [Congregationalist]. The Life and Character of Miss Susanna Anthony [1726-1791], Consisting Chiefly in Extracts from her Writings, with Some Brief Observations on Them (Worcester, MA, 1796), ed. by Samuel Hopkins (1721-1803) of Rhode Island. In 1803 John Ryland (Bristol) issued his own edition of this work, now titled Memoirs of Miss Susanna Anthony, printed at Clipston by J. W. Morris and sold in London by William Button, among others.

Hannah Lawrance (1795–1875) [Independent]. The History of Woman in England, and her Influence on Society and Literature (1843).

 

(No Political Discourse)

Barbauld, Anna Letitia (1743-1825) [Unitarian]. Sins of Government, Sins of the Nation. London: J. Johnson, 1793. 

Coltman, Elizabeth. The Warning. Recommended to the Serious Attention of all Christians, and Lovers of their Country. London: Darton and Harvey [c. 1805].

 

Hays, Mary. Harry Clinton; or, a Tale of Youth. London: J. Johnson, 1804.

Coltman, Elizabeth. Plain Tales, chiefly intended for the use of Charity Schools. London: Vernor and Hood, 1799.

---. Plain Tales; or the Advantages of Industry over Idleness. 2nd ed. London: J. Harris, 1804, 1807.

Hays, Mary. The History of England ... in a Series of Letters to a Young lady at School (Charlotte Smith, of which Hays wrote one volume). London: R. Phillips, 1806.

 

Neale, Henrietta (1752-1802) [Baptist]. Amusement Hall; or, An Easy Introduction to the Attainment of Useful Knowledge. By a Lady.  London: Printed for and sold by T. Gardiner, No. 19, Princes-street, Cavendish-square: Sold also by T. Chapman ... J. Mathews ... W. Button and M. Trapp, Paternoster-row; and J. Martin, Jun., No. 432, Oxford-street, 1794.

Adams, Hannah (1755-1831) [American Unitarian]. An Alphabetical Compendium of the Various Sects which have Appeared in the World from the Beginning of the Christian Aera to the Present Day. With an Appendix Containing a Brief Account of the Different Schemes of Religion now Embraced Among Mankind, etc. Boston: B. Edes and Sons, 1784; first British edition, London: W. Button & Sons, 1805. 

Adams, Hannah. An Abridgement of the History of New-England for the Use of Young Persons. Boston: Homans and West, 1805; reprinted in Dunstable by the Baptist minister, J. W. Morris in 1806.

 

Hays, Mary. Historical Dialogues for Young Persons. 3 vols. London: Printed for J. Johnson, St. Paul’s Churchyard; and J. Mawman, Poultry, 1807.  

 

Neale, Henrietta. Sacred History, in Familiar Dialogues, for the Instruction of Children and Youth ... By a Lady. London: Printed and sold by T. Gardiner, No. 19, Prince’s street, Cavendish-square; sold also by T. Chapman, No. 151, Fleet-street; J. Mathews, Strand; W. Button, and T. Priestley, Paternoster-row; J. Martin, jun. No. 432, Oxford-street; T. Conder, No. 30, Bucklersbury, and T. Knott, No. 47, Lombard-street, 1796.

Copley, Esther [Hewlett] (1786-1851) [Baptist]. A Brief View of Sacred History from the Creation of the World to the Destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans. London: William Darton and Son, 1831.

 

Hays, Mary. The Brothers; or, Consequences: A Story of What Happens Every Day; Addressed to that Most Useful Part of the Community, the Labouring Poor. London: Button and Son, 1815.  

Hays, Mary. Family Annals, or The Sisters. London: Printed for W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, Stationers’ Court, Ludgate Street, 1817. Title page notes: “Author of the Brothers, Female Biography, Historical Dialogues for Young persons, Harry Clinton, a Tale for Youth, &c. &c.”  

Coltman, Eliza. The History of Jenny Hickling; a Living Character. London: Tilling and Hughes, undated [c.1815]; numerous editions by Religious Tract Society.

[During 1815 William Button also published Joseph Cottle’s The Messiah and Cottle’s volume, Selection of Poems, designed chiefly for Schools and Young Persons, in collaboration with Mary Bryan of Bristol, apparently a bookseller in Bristol. He only published 3 works for young readers, of which one was by Mary Hays].  Review of Brothers in GM 120 (1816), 251-52 closes with this: ‘The whole production shews evidently a cultivated understanding, and a good heart . . . [everyone home should have a copy because] It would be infinitely more serviceable than the miserable trash which is ostentatiously obtruded on them by the intemperate zeal of illiterate enthusiastic visionaries, under the misnomer of Religious Tracts” (252). 

Hughes, Mary (1756-1824) [Anglican/Unitarian]. The Twin Brothers, or Good Luck and Good Conduct. London: Christian Tract Society, various editions.  [Unitarian version of the Religious Tract Society].

Hughes, Mary. William’s Return, or Good News for Cottagers. London: Christian Tract Society, c. 1811-13 [sold by Cradock and Joy].

Copley, Esther [Hewlett] (1786-1851). Cottage Comforts, with Hints for Promoting them, Gleaned from Experience: Enlivened with Authentic Anecdotes. London: Simpkin and Marshall, 1825.

Hays, Mary. Memoirs of Queens: Illustrious and Celebrated. London: T. and J. Allman, Booksellers to Her Majesty, Prince’s Street, Hanover-Square. 1821.

   Lawrence, Hannah. Historical Memoirs of the Queens of England. 2 vols. London: E. Moxon, 

   1838-40. 

 

Lanfear, Elizabeth Hays. Letters to Young Ladies on Their Entrance into the World; to which are added Sketches from Real Life.  J. Robins and Co., 1824; 2nd ed. 1828.

   Coltman, Elizabeth. Familiar Letters Addressed to Children and Young Persons of the Middle 

   Ranks. London: Darton and Harvey, 1811.

   Copley, Esther [Hewlett]. The Young Servant's Friendly Instructor, or, A Summary of the Duties of   

   Domestic Servants. London: Simpkin and Marshall, 1827.

   ---. The Young Wife, or Hints to Married Daughters. London:  Religious Tract Society, 18[?].  

 

NB:  Five of Mary Hays’s printers/publishers/booksellers were also used by other dissenting women writers who were her contemporaries (names are in bold above). These are Thomas Knott of Lombard Street (Hays, de Fleury, and Henrietta Neale); Joseph Johnson (Hays and Scott); Richard Phillips (Hays, Coltman, and Steele); William Button (Hays, Susanna Anthony, Hannah Adams); and Simpkin and Marshall (Hays and Copley). 

 

NB: de Fleury’s Falsehood Examined (1791) is an interesting case study in dissenting publishing culture for women writers at that time. Thomas Wilkins was a dissenter and probably a Baptist, given his publishing history. In this case, the turned the pamphlet over to three women for distribution: Mary Trapp, the former Mary Lewis, daughter of Mary Lewis (1705-91), former publisher (in business with her husband John [d. 1754]) of John Cennick and George Whitefield and Anne Dutton. Her daughter was listed as "Mrs. Priestley" in 1796, quite possibly the second wife of the Rev. Timothy Priestley (brother of Joseph Priestley), an Independent minister and an evangelical compatriot of the Lewises and Trapps in London throughout the 1770s and into the 1790s. Mary Lewis Trapp Priestley would continue the family printing/bookselling business  at No.1 Paternoster Row for a few more years, eventually ending a family business at that location that had flourished since the 1740s. Martha Gurney was a close friend and associate of the elder Mary Lewis and operated her business, for many years in conjunction with William Fox, at 128 Holborn Hill. Her sister-in-law, Rebecca Gurney, was the close friend of Eliza Gould who invited her to live in the Walworth home in 1798 and who in 1799 took her to Newgate Prison to meet the close friend of the Gurney family, Benjamin Flower, who would marry Gould on 1 January 1800. The other seller, of course, was Maria de Fleury, making this one of the few, if not the only work, published in London in the 1790s and sold exclusively by three evangelical Calvinist women – two Baptists and one Congregationalist. 

 

 

Compiled by Timothy Whelan, 2017.